Nancy Mitchnick & Ryan Debolski @ the Center for Visual Arts

Painting and photography are two different (and at one point competing) media with the same objective: to capture a moment. Nancy Mitchnick and Ryan Debolski, who both have work on display at the Center for Visual Art’s galleries, capture moments of disruption, decay, and formation.

Mitchnick depicts images of domestic structures in various states, showing landscapes both constructed and natural. Debolski uses the camera to capture images of isolation and vulnerability that are unmistakably masculine, though they embody the opposite of what we’ve been conditioned to consider as such. These separate shows share a connection through the histories of their chosen methods and also through ideas of transition.

Mitchnick’s large scale paintings focus on houses, using muted tones that are extremely pleasing and evoke feelings that are reminiscent of David Lynch’s signature unsettling 1950’s aesthetic. That nagging feeling that something lies beneath even though all appears fine on the surface. Large swatches of pinks, blues, and expressive brush strokes only add to this eerily calm aura.

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Triptych of paintings, Nancy Mitchnick

The paintings as a whole can be seen as linear, there is a before, during, and after. Starting with a scene of nature and ending with a house in a state of irreversible wreckage. The triptych of trees, abundant with brush-y marks and greens gives us a scene that nature regularly intervenes on – think of the change of the seasons. We don’t give this a second thought because it’s expected. This acts as a contrast to the disruptions occurring in the other paintings where the changes don’t seem all that predictable.

Flux is a constant state in life and both Mitchnick and Debolski confront us with this truth in their work. While Mitchnick shows us a break down in structures, Ryan Debolski’s series of photographs present us with the formation and construction of relationships, both personal and environmental.

Construction sites and building materials, rendered in black and white, give a sense of potential and also a sense of static; the disruption of construction zones is well known to many commuters. Compositions in several of the works are arranged so that attention is on the giant pieces of machinery, the extensions of the workers hands that form the sites as they dig, lift, and roll. Raw materials and machinery carry baggage, but at the same time also carry a universal meaning due to the people who control them and the structures they end up erecting.

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Set of four photographs, Ryan Debolski

In contrast to the cold machinery and materials are scenes of men, most likely workers, enjoying themselves on a beach. Images of bodies interacting – despite being dragged about – evoke a tender feeling, complimented by the image of a snake being released from a plastic water bottle. An ubiquitous masculine symbol being affected by a simple act of kindness. The emphasis in these works isn’t on the energy, movement, or symbols, but on ideas of isolation and the formation of relationships.

These two artists’ works are about shifting focus to what lies beneath, to give us insight on what is not always apparent at first glance. When thought about together the tension between photography and painting is unavoidable, adding another layer of complexity to these two separate bodies of work. Both these artists succeed in pausing life’s constant movement and allow us a moment to contemplate it.

 

Nancy Mitchnick’s work is on view in the CVA’s Main Gallery until October 6th. Ryan Debolski’s Break is on view in the Clement Gallery until October 31st. There will be a reception during the Third Thursday Loop on September 21st from 6-8PM. For more information please visit http://www.utoledo.edu/al/svpa/art/galleries/.

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“Trans Human,” K.A. Letts @ River House Arts

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9 Muses, Vinyl applique

The future is an uncertain condition that continues to be the subject of speculation: what will become of our planet, of our species, of our own personal futures? K.A. Letts’ new body of work mines tales and styles from the past to present an interpretation of what the future could hold.

With the integration of the internet, smartphones, and social media into our everyday lives, our culture has shifted itself to align with technology. Our attempts to enhance ourselves physically, intellectually, and technologically is explored by Letts through the revisitation of ancient tales and myths that have largely shaped many cultures. The urge to overcome our (human) limitations – to get more, make more, and feed a sort of hunger that never seems to be satiated – is fueled by ambition. Throughout the work themes of inspiration and ambition are present in subject matter and even technique. The stylish and meticulously rendered paintings visually hearken back to Cubism and Abstraction, while the subject matter references the Bible and Greek mythology.

9 Muses, a large cut-out wall piece, catches the eye with its liveliness and movement, setting the tone for the rest of the show. The muses were female figures that granted inspiration to people in several different artistic areas. Throughout the exhibition there seems to be an exploration of women as shapers of culture – whether it’s through inspiration or through their actions. The tales presented traditionally have been seen as matters of good and bad, black or white, but are presented outside of those binaries within these works. Humans are complex creatures after all.

Tree of Knowledge 1 & 2 read like topographical maps of a confusing terrain. Based on the biblical tale of Lucifer’s offering of infinite knowledge to Eve, the two works can be compared to mapping, building, and infrastructure – some of the many marks we have as humans on this world. A muted color palette of black, white, and gold is visible throughout most of the work, along with the morphing images of human bodies. The shifting and evolution from what we know now as human and what the shape of things to come can be is presented in a subtle manner. There are no cyborgs, no machines, no artificial intelligence, just human tales interpreted and rendered by the human hand.

Does looking back to the past allow us to imagine the future? Whether universal or personal is the future even fathomable? Through looking back to tales that have shaped culture for centuries Trans Human gives a personal interpretation, both intimate and culturally specific, at what the future may hold. Even with speculation the future is an out-of-focus, close-but-far-away prospect that is tricky to concretely imagine. Despite that Letts’ proposition throughout this collection of work is both beautiful and mysterious.

 

For more information on the artist and their work visit http://www.kalettsart.com/. Please visit http://river-house-arts.com/ for more on this and upcoming exhibitions.