“Whipstitch: The State of Contemporary Textiles” @ Gallery 117, Ann Arbor Art Center

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Send Katy & Valentine, Rebecca Ringquist

The convergence of technology and fiber is ingrained within the discipline’s history; Jacquard punch cards paved the way for the invention of the first computers. Whipstitch: The State of Contemporary Textiles takes a look at the many facets of fiber and its existence as an industrial, decorative, technological, and highly intimate practice.

Dreamer (Series) #1: Maitena, a multi-media piece by Reed Esslinger-Payet, taps into universal concerns through emotional intimacy. A little girl’s outline, a cyanotype, is presented on a woven hammock and accompanied by an audio component: an interview with a male immigrant. He laments that he is able to disguise his background if he stays silent but is worried about speaking to others as it would give him away. He also worries about how the current socio-political climate of the country will affect his daughter. The outline of the body on the hammock is an imprint, a memory of simpler times, but simultaneously resembles a chalk outline. The work rides a fine line between memory and memorial.

Sensory experience is often a part of fabrics and textiles: the vibrancy of the colors, the feel of the materials, and even the sounds they make. Soft Sound, a work by EJTECH, an entity consisting of artists Esteban de la Torre & Judit Eszter Karpati, explores sound within textiles through the use of a conductive material adhered to fabric and activated with neodymium magnets. It’s a performative textile that comes off as a scientific project, emitting a low hum, which can be compared to white noise. The production of sound from the sculpture is reminiscent of the Fluxus attitude towards music, one that put forth that everyday background and white noise can be considered as a “legitimate” piece of music.


A less mechanical approach of blurring boundaries within textiles can be seen in several wearable pieces in the exhibition. A marriage of interaction and activation is presented by Heidi Kuamao’s Wired Wear. The work features an audio-activated bra that lights up as sound intensifies. Video documentation of the garment being worn, on loop, plays next to the work. At one point the video shows a train speeding by, sounding its whistle causing the bra to light up. This scene brings to mind the often sexualized images of women hitchhiking throughout pop culture. The garment, and its activation, transcend that issue by evoking a curiosity when it comes to the mechanics of the piece.


Video accompanying fiber was a running theme throughout this exhibition. Varied Choreographies by Erika Lynn Hansen & Wes Kline presents a woven rug placed in front of a large screen playing an animation. This piece creates a place of meditation that exists between the physically fabricated and the digitally fabricated; a delineation between the two where the viewer can exist in an in-between space away from the everyday.

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Apparently the smog has something to do it with: 3 & 5, Erika Lynna Hanson

Blurring boundaries with technology allows textiles to no longer be confined to the old conventions that they are commonly associated with it. Pushing and questioning traditions, as well as exploring the potential and the future of textile work, is invigorating. Whipstitch gives the audience a glimpse into that future and shows us the possibility of what’s to come.

 

Whipstitch: The State of Contemporary Textiles is on view at the 117 Gallery at the Ann Arbor Art Center through April 29th. For more information visit: http://www.annarborartcenter.org/exhibitions/whipstitch-state-contemporary-textiles/

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