“Trans Human,” K.A. Letts @ River House Arts

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9 Muses, Vinyl applique

The future is an uncertain condition that continues to be the subject of speculation: what will become of our planet, of our species, of our own personal futures? K.A. Letts’ new body of work mines tales and styles from the past to present an interpretation of what the future could hold.

With the integration of the internet, smartphones, and social media into our everyday lives, our culture has shifted itself to align with technology. Our attempts to enhance ourselves physically, intellectually, and technologically is explored by Letts through the revisitation of ancient tales and myths that have largely shaped many cultures. The urge to overcome our (human) limitations – to get more, make more, and feed a sort of hunger that never seems to be satiated – is fueled by ambition. Throughout the work themes of inspiration and ambition are present in subject matter and even technique. The stylish and meticulously rendered paintings visually hearken back to Cubism and Abstraction, while the subject matter references the Bible and Greek mythology.

9 Muses, a large cut-out wall piece, catches the eye with its liveliness and movement, setting the tone for the rest of the show. The muses were female figures that granted inspiration to people in several different artistic areas. Throughout the exhibition there seems to be an exploration of women as shapers of culture – whether it’s through inspiration or through their actions. The tales presented traditionally have been seen as matters of good and bad, black or white, but are presented outside of those binaries within these works. Humans are complex creatures after all.

Tree of Knowledge 1 & 2 read like topographical maps of a confusing terrain. Based on the biblical tale of Lucifer’s offering of infinite knowledge to Eve, the two works can be compared to mapping, building, and infrastructure – some of the many marks we have as humans on this world. A muted color palette of black, white, and gold is visible throughout most of the work, along with the morphing images of human bodies. The shifting and evolution from what we know now as human and what the shape of things to come can be is presented in a subtle manner. There are no cyborgs, no machines, no artificial intelligence, just human tales interpreted and rendered by the human hand.

Does looking back to the past allow us to imagine the future? Whether universal or personal is the future even fathomable? Through looking back to tales that have shaped culture for centuries Trans Human gives a personal interpretation, both intimate and culturally specific, at what the future may hold. Even with speculation the future is an out-of-focus, close-but-far-away prospect that is tricky to concretely imagine. Despite that Letts’ proposition throughout this collection of work is both beautiful and mysterious.

 

For more information on the artist and their work visit http://www.kalettsart.com/. Please visit http://river-house-arts.com/ for more on this and upcoming exhibitions.

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“Heterogeneous: States of American,” Josh Byers, David Cuatlacuatl, and Faith Goodman @ River House Arts

What is the American identity? We are experiencing a time of intense debate when it comes to who and what is considered American. As the push against the United States’ melting pot heritage continues, three Toledo-based artists’ works are brought together to examine what it means to be American; a concept which can be encapsulated by a single word: difference.

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Works by Josh Byers, David Cuatlacuatl, and Faith Goodman.

A mix of painting, collage, and ceramic sculpture from Josh Byers takes a trip down memory lane by presenting a nostalgic, yet sharp, look at formative years. Sketches and doodles of pop-cultural icons and consumables litter the work: Hustler, Penthouse, and Playboy covers, Etch A Sketches, and Trapper Keepers. Images of buxom celebrities, and manly heroes of the seventies and eighties exude a distinct masculinity that was a hallmark of the their time, as well as echo the male anxiety that was a defining feature of Reagan’s America. Byers’ work speaks of the quintessential American infatuation with pop-culture and its fads, trends, and advertising that, to this day, is still growing strong.

American identity can’t be boiled down to consumption alone, there’s also aspects of rejection inherent within it. Faith Goodman’s work deals with a rejection of identity due to not meeting the expectations of one’s culture. Goodman processes this struggle through use of stereotypes and foods commonly associated with Black culture, appropriating typically racist caricatures to subvert expectations built from decades of ignorance. Mixed media and paintings confront the viewer with issues that many would rather just ignore or erase: imagery of watermelons with seeds in formation of how slaves were packed into ships as they were abducted, sculptures created from weaves, hair and tar, and depictions of voluptuous and vicious feminine forms. The confrontational work is timely, echoing the struggles – historically and contemporarily – that Black Americans are facing in this time of intense opposition.

The instability of existence, whether it’s due to social, economical, or political circumstances, is dealt with through issues of boundaries and mobility in David Cuatlacuatl’s work. Paintings and mixed media collage feature figures from pop-culture and found objects, giving them new meaning and life in disjointed compositions. The work is simplistic, an intentional move that takes a jab at the idea of value and hierarchies, which seem to constantly shift. Concepts of conquest – of nature, body, and consumption – are depicted on flat, matte surfaces, never following a linear path. The elements in Cuatlacuatl’s work come together to form snippets of a story, never presenting the full version, though we really don’t need it.

We’re currently in a time where the idea of what’s American is a polarizing issue. These three artists’ works meld together to show that the American identity is more complex, complicated, and varied than most would care to admit. This exhibition serves as a timely reminder that identity, American or otherwise, is always in flux and comprised of so many elements that the only constant factor is difference.

Heterogeneous: States of American is on view until March 4th. For more information visit http://www.river-house-arts.com/